Human rights are for everyone. We may need them when we’re young and at school or in the care of the state. We might need them at work, when we’re struggling to live a full life, or when we’re dealing with the police. We may need human rights if we have a mental health problem and need extra care, or if we’re living in a care home when we’re older. The patients badly treated in Stafford Hospital had human rights, as did the children who were abused in Rotherham.

We all have human rights, they can be a safety net when the worst happens, or a tool for justice when we are let down by the system.

Many important changes have come about because people have relied on human rights to shine a light on problems and unfairness. Much of the time, human rights work to ensure the system works for everyone.

The role human rights have played does not make the headlines; but is vital to the people involved. The stories we tell about human rights affect the way we think about them, and the way people use them. It’s only when we know the whole story, the story about how human rights help us throughout our lives, that we can see how vital they are.

We have pulled together some of these important cases into Rights for Life. These are the stories which we want people to think of when they wonder if human rights are relevant or important in Britain today. These are some of the stories which people should be sharing about human rights.

If you would like to find out more than click here to download our brochure.