Ensuring families get the truth after their relatives die in hospital

Health and Wellbeing: Ensuring families get the truth after their relatives die in hospital

John Moore-Robinson was 20 years old when he died after being misdiagnosed by A&E staff at Stafford Hospital in 2006.

John had a serious accident on his mountain bike but doctors failed to recognise he had a ruptured spleen and sent him away with painkillers. He collapsed at home and died the next day.

A brief inquest a year later did not expose the hospital’s mistake.

In 2008 when John’s mum and dad gave evidence to the independent inquiry into care at Stafford they discovered that an A&E consultant had written a report criticising the care provided to John – which the authorities had not shared at the original inquest. Finding out the hospital had this evidence but chose to keep it from them compounded his family’s grief.

Families need justice, openness and transparency after a death in the care of the state and human rights laws ensure this happens. With the help of Action against Medical Accidents (an independent patient safety charity), John’s parents secured a second inquest which examined all the circumstances of John’s death, looked at the NHS Trust’s systems and heard important evidence and witnesses not called in the original inquest. After an eight year battle to get the truth, it was thanks to the Human Rights Act that John’s family finally got a full and fearless inquiry into how their son died.

 

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It was thanks to the Human Rights Act that John’s family finally got a full and fearless inquiry into how their son died

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